Keppie Careers http://www.keppiecareers.com Social media speaker, social media consultant, job search coach Tue, 29 Jul 2014 10:30:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.3 When you should use “reply all” http://www.keppiecareers.com/use-reply/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/use-reply/#comments Tue, 29 Jul 2014 10:30:29 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=11968 While some say email is a dying breed (some colleges don’t even assign students email addresses), the fact is, many people still rely on email for personal and work communication. Even though this avenue of communication is considered a dinosaur by...

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file5551237405366While some say email is a dying breed (some colleges don’t even assign students email addresses), the fact is, many people still rely on email for personal and work communication. Even though this avenue of communication is considered a dinosaur by those shifting to texting or direct messaging for their main modes of keeping in touch, there are still etiquette elements that confuse some users and cause consternation among their peers and colleagues. Chief among them is “reply all.”

Innocuous enough, on the surface, “reply all” is a great convenience. Instead of typing everyone’s email address on a distribution, you can easily send an email to everyone on the list. However, we’ve all heard stories of how things can easily go awry when people mistakenly reply to an entire list instead of one person.

No one likes to get emails they don’t need to see, and even if the solution is a swift tap of the “delete” button, using “reply to all” on email messages can irritate people. Consider these situations and think twice before you send your next email to everyone on the possible recipient list.

Find a job in communications

Who needs to know?

Do “reply all” when everyone receiving the email really needs to know what you have to say. For example, when your boss asks everyone on the team via email to step up to handle a particular, timely project. Reply to all if you’re volunteering so no one else does extra work you are already handling. However, if you are too busy, or have three other projects on your docket and cannot pick up the extra work, there is no need to reply to all. No one else needs to know what you’re doing; just reply to your boss to let her know you aren’t planning to take on the project unless you hear back from her.

Thanks.

When you’re just saying “thanks,” or a similar message, it’s usually not necessary for everyone to see it. Don’t reply all with inconsequential information or notes; send those directly to the people who need to see them only. Otherwise, you’ll likely inspire everyone else to roll their eyes in disdain when they open your email to find it contains nothing of consequence.

Personal comments.

If you’re adding a personal comment to your note, don’t include it in a “reply to all” message. For example, if you’re asking how a person’s date went last night, or commenting on a particular personal detail, send it only to the person intended, not to the whole office.

Angry emails.

Don’t reply to all if you are angry. Generally, it’s best to avoid responding to anything in writing if you are upset, but it’s even more dangerous to blanket the whole office with an email written in the heat of the moment.

Snarky messages.

By the same token, do not use reply all if you are being snarky, scolding or disrespectful. Keep in mind, anything you put in writing can and will be used against you. Sending a less-than-kind message out to a whole list of people increases the chances that you’ll regret it later.

Bottom line.

Always think before sending a message to a group and ask yourself if anything in the message is appropriate for everyone on the distribution list. Then, question whether or not everyone on the list would appreciate the contents of the information: do they need to have this email? If not, change your reply to reach only the necessary recipients, and everyone will be happier.

Originally appeared on AOLJobs.com.

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Are recruiters using Facebook? http://www.keppiecareers.com/are-recruiters-using-facebook/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/are-recruiters-using-facebook/#comments Thu, 24 Jul 2014 10:30:48 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=11960 Do you know what recruiters like more than anything? Easy access to find quality candidates and few barriers to entry. Do you know one way you can provide this? Use Facebook as a professional platform. Unless you’ve been living under...

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file1111243438731Do you know what recruiters like more than anything? Easy access to find quality candidates and few barriers to entry. Do you know one way you can provide this? Use Facebook as a professional platform.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you know posting unprofessional information on Facebook can prevent you from landing a job. Employers don’t like profanity, comments about illegal drugs, posts of a sexual nature or excessive misspellings and bad grammar. What they do like, according to Jobvite’s research, is to be able to find you online and to learn about you. If you put time, effort and energy into creating some public information in Facebook, you could find yourself with a new job sooner than you thought.

Recruiters are looking for you.
Recruiters will source new hires where ever they can find them. With the exponential number of people using Facebook and the amount of time they spend there, it isn’t surprising to learn from Undercover Recruiter that 70 percent of recruiters say they connect better with potential jobseekers due to widespread use of Facebook and 85 percent of recruiters using Facebook recommend it as a tool to other recruiters. (Tweet this stat.)

Companies are spending a lot of time, effort and money to connect with you on Facebook. They want you to “like” their career pages, and they hope you’ll post smart messages there. Don’t disappoint them.

Make your information available.
You don’t have to post your vacation photos for everyone to see, but if you want to be found, it’s a good idea to allow certain sections of your Facebook profile to be public, including: Work and Education, Professional Skills and Contact information. Not only will this make it possible for people looking for someone with your skills to find you, it also provides professional information that will help people in your network connect with you when they are in job search mode.

Another benefit of making this data public, it allows you to engage with Glassdoor.com’s“Inside Connections” tool, which provides job seekers access to their Facebook networks to identify people who work at companies with interesting jobs. When people in your network provide public professional data on Facebook, you’ll also be able to access information from friends of friends for networking purposes via this tool. Clearly, making these items public on Facebook helps you be found as well as enhances networking opportunities. Since four in ten job seekers found their favorite or best job through personal connections, don’t ignore this opportunity to tap your online network.

Give them a little something.
Since many recruiters want to know a little something about you beyond what’s on your resume, why not give them a little professional information? Create public updates in your private Facebook page and you have the opportunity to post and share certain items that will be easy for people you do not know to find. This is easy to do.

Follow the link on the top of your Facebook page to check your privacy settings.

Once there, click on the icon that says “Followers” on the left side of the screen. Then, under Who Can Follow Me, select the drop down that says “Everybody.”

This will give you an option to create public updates and for people to “follow” your public updates. Public updates can include links to news about your industry. If you’re in customer service, you can occasionally post a public update about the latest customer service trends. If you are a bank teller, you can post links about your company’s financials.

Answer the key question.
There’s no more important question to answer for job seekers than, “How can I help employers find me?” Facebook could be one way to answer it.

Originally appeared on AOLJobs.com.

 

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Is it a good idea to work for a friend? http://www.keppiecareers.com/good-idea-work-friend/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/good-idea-work-friend/#comments Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:30:21 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=11958 You need a job, and a friend needs some help. Perhaps it’s a match made in heaven. Or, it’s the beginning of a nightmare you wish you never began. Does working for a friend offer potential or pitfalls? Is it a good...

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file9571236549144You need a job, and a friend needs some help. Perhaps it’s a match made in heaven. Or, it’s the beginning of a nightmare you wish you never began. Does working for a friend offer potential or pitfalls?

Is it a good idea to work for a friend? In certain circumstances, where the stars all align, it can be great. If you plan ahead and consider potential pitfalls, you’ll have a better chance of thriving in this work situation.

Consider the worst-case scenario. 
If things don’t work out, how will you feel if you lose the friendship? If you’re considering working for your very best friend, it may be too much of a risk.

What’s your history with the friend? 
One of the good things about working for a friend is that you may be able to rely on your knowledge to predict how she will be as a boss. Use what you know about your friend to decide if your relationship could overcome a professional disagreement or split. Does your friend hold grudges? Is he very dogmatic and only sees things his way? Have you experienced any difficulties or disagreements in your friendship in the past, and were you able to get past them? If your friendship has never been stressed and tested, it may not be the best idea to start now. However, if you know you can argue like cats and dogs and still “kiss and make up,” perhaps it’s worth the risk.

Make sure you are qualified. 
Usually, it’s up to the boss to decide if you’re qualified for the job. However, when you’re considering working for a friend, it’s a good idea to be responsible for figuring out if you’re a good match for the job. (Tweet this thought.) Your friend may give you a generous benefit of the doubt or assume you know certain things you really don’t. Be clear about the job description and how you can help accomplish the goals. If you can’t solve the organization’s problems, don’t take the job.

Get it in writing. 
Nothing is worse than ruining a good friendship over a misunderstanding. If you don’t already have one, ask for a definition of your job in writing. It’s important for everyone to understand what you are hired to do, and having it in writing means there’s no room for questions later.

Expect conflict. 
It’s not unusual for people who know each other well to eliminate professionally appropriate filters from conversation. Expect it will be tense at times. Conflict isn’t always a bad thing, and you can always agree to disagree.

Communicate.
Communicating clearly will be important before you decide to take a job working for your friend, and it will be even more important once you are working for him or her.

Make a well-informed decision. 
Without a crystal ball, you’ll never know if working for a friend will work out or not until you try. Just be sure you don’t go in blindly and overlook potential trouble spots and red flags.

Originally appeared on AOLJobs.com.

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Is it okay to swear at work? http://www.keppiecareers.com/okay-swear-work/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/okay-swear-work/#comments Thu, 17 Jul 2014 10:30:42 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=11956 It wouldn’t be surprising if you’ve heard what used to be language reserved for the locker room at work. As what used to be considered vulgar language makes its way into popular culture and finds its way on TV, many...

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Don't Say That jar, collecting coins for bad wordsIt wouldn’t be surprising if you’ve heard what used to be language reserved for the locker room at work. As what used to be considered vulgar language makes its way into popular culture and finds its way on TV, many believe it’s appropriate for professional settings, too.

Academic research validates that, sometimes, swearing does not negatively affect credibility. Forbes reported on a study by Cory R. Scherer and Brad J. Sagarin, who were at Northern Illinois University. Students listened to three speeches, and the two whose speakers cursed scored as being more persuasive than the speech without curse words.

In their study “Swearing at Work and Permissive Leadership Culture: When Anti-Social Becomes Social and Incivility Is Acceptable,” researchers Yehuda Baruch and Stuart Jenkins, of University of East Anglia in the U.K., discovered that swearing at work can actually help workers bond together, improve team spirit and form relationships. Especially if it’s unexpected, swearing can win attention (both positive and negative) and the user may gain authority, even if just for the moment.

If swearing can win friends and influence people, is it ever a big mistake?

In cases where professionals are expected to refrain from impulsivity, cursing at work may be damaging. If your job is to appear in control at all times, randomly letting out a stream of expletives is not going to enhance your credibility or trustworthiness. Additionally, keep in mind, some will view your use of profanity as a weapon to try to dominate a situation or to aggressively seize power from more polite peers.

There are also gradations of swearing, and some may be more acceptable at work than others. For example, saying, “sh**” after spilling a glass of water on yourself is unlikely to raise many eyebrows. Cursing someone out because they’ve made a mistake, on the other hand, could get you in trouble, even in the most profanity-friendly workplaces.

Should you drop the “F-bomb” at work? Interestingly, a survey on the Today Show’s website suggests no, by a vote of 31% to 69%.

Unless it is clear (for example, in many trading floors in the financial sector or on a loading dock) that swearing is an acceptable and expected way of communicating in your workplace, with so many potential uncertainties, including gender dynamics, individual preferences and the emotional responses possible, the best advice is to use profanity sparingly, if at all, when you’re at work.

Originally appeared on AOLJobs.com.

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Things that drive you crazy about corporate life http://www.keppiecareers.com/crazy-corporate-life/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/crazy-corporate-life/#comments Tue, 15 Jul 2014 10:30:12 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=11954 What drives you crazy about the corporate world? In an environment where conformity seems to be the rule, you may have even caught yourself participating in some of these hated rituals – even as you mock them to friends in...

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file0001344010980What drives you crazy about the corporate world? In an environment where conformity seems to be the rule, you may have even caught yourself participating in some of these hated rituals – even as you mock them to friends in happy hour after work. In the new, third edition of her book, They Don’t Teach Corporate in College, Alexandra Levit points out these conventions and traditions we love to hate.

1. Corporate Déjà Vu. It seems as though it’s a requirement in business that you spend huge amounts of time reporting the same information in a dozen different formats, attending status meetings where conversation from the week before is repeated word for word and where you put out the same fires, because your department doesn’t learn from its mistakes.

2. Name dropping. Also known as “invoking syndrome,” this occurs when colleagues try to persuade you to do what they want by name-dropping someone higher up. Whether the executive manager was actually involved or not, invoking him is a manipulative tactic used to get you to bend to your colleagues’ wishes. For example: “Really? Well, I spoke to the CEO last night, and he told me we have to do the event this way.”

3. Ego-mania. When certain people reach a high level in a company, they think that they are better than everyone else and that they are entitled to be treated like a god. Regardless of the issue, they believe they are always right and that they can’t possibly learn anything from someone lower on the chain.

4. Corporate jargon. If you think everyone in the business world speaks your language, think again. The business world’s language is one of subtlety, filled with euphemisms and pet phrases to cleverly disguise what people actually mean.

5. BureaucracyHow many departments does it take to screw in a lightbulb? Corporate business has a lengthy approval process for everything, and companies delight in changing those processes constantly so that you’re never sure which 10 departments you need to consult before a decision can be made.

6. Hypocrisy. Don’t you just love the way some companies tout values such as quality, entrepreneurship, innovation and integrity, when they would be perfectly happy if their employees just kept quiet and never suggested a disruptive change?

7. Uncommon Sense. Is common sense dead in the business world? People might make a joke of it, but this dearth of logical thought is kind of sad. It’s also frustrating when the obviously correct way to do something is staring everyone right in the face, and no one sees it.

8. Nonsensical Change. Every now and then, companies will decide to throw their departments up in the air and see where all the pieces land. Yes, it’s the reorganization (otherwise known as the dreaded re-org). Despite the fact that it results in mass confusion, greatly decreased productivity and low employee morale, companies continue to do it year after year.

Originally appeared on AOLJobs.com.

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Is it important to have privacy on LinkedIn? http://www.keppiecareers.com/privacy-linked-in/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/privacy-linked-in/#comments Thu, 10 Jul 2014 10:30:39 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=11952 Privacy. Clearly, it’s fleeting in our “tell all,” “share everything on social media” society. As the fine line between the personal and the professional (is there even a line at all?) becomes less and less significant, it’s even more important...

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DSCN8580Privacy. Clearly, it’s fleeting in our “tell all,” “share everything on social media” society. As the fine line between the personal and the professional (is there even a line at all?) becomes less and less significant, it’s even more important to be vigilant so you know what you are sharing, with whom and potential consequences. Make no mistake about it: it’s up to you to manage your online identify and privacy.

One of the main benefits of using social media is it allows you to be found. In fact, it’s a main tenet of social media; your goal online should be to be discovered, and to magnetically attract people you want to hire you for jobs or consulting opportunities. Traditional media outlets would have you believe the worst thing you can do for your career is post information on social media. They feature big mistakes people make online leading to loss of income and jobs as representative reasons to stay offline.

However, for job seekers and business owners, it’s dangerous to don the online equivalent of Harry Potter’s invisibility cloak. Professional goals are difficult to accomplish if privacy settings are locked down to the point they effectively render the profiles useless. However, reducing privacy puts the onus on the user to understand ramifications of not sharing information they make private.

LinkedIn is clearly a key player in your professional online identity. Your goal on LinkedIn is to connect and engage with people; it’s expected that you will have a LinkedIn profile. Generally speaking, the best advice is to peruse privacy settings and choose the most open (least private) choice. Doing so positions you to be found more easily, and potentially to be invited to apply for opportunities. However, each individual user will have specific goals and reasons to share or want to hide certain information online. Overly tight privacy settings on LinkedIn can lead you to miss opportunities. These tips will help. (Tweet this thought.)

Review and scrutinize your choices on these settings in particular:

Turn on/off your activity broadcasts.
If you’re running an illicit job search, and planning to conduct a major overhaul of your LinkedIn profile, turn this off before making changes if you are worried it will alert your current boss. Consider turning it back on after your profile overhaul is complete.

Because LinkedIn will send out a message announcing that you have a new job if you update your job titles or add a project to your “experience” section, others who sometimes get dinged by this setting are people who own businesses and decide to change their official titles or people in jobs who update their job titles to be more descriptive or interesting. The last thing this group wants is for people to think they’ve taken new positions.

Communications.
Be alert and aware of how LinkedIn works by keeping an eye on messages you receive from the network. Check the “Communications” tab under settings to ensure you do receive the type of messages that will help you decide what you want to share with others.

Select what others see when you’ve viewed their profile. If you’re doing some “undercover” research on colleagues or competitors, feel free to set this to “anonymous.” However, leaving the setting locked down prevents you from seeing who is viewing your profile, and that represents lost opportunities. In general, it can be a good idea to let people know you’ve viewed their profile, especially before an interview. It makes you appear to be thorough and diligent about your research.

Select who can see your connections.
Some people worry they’ll compromise their privacy by allowing people to know who is connected to them. If you are in such a cut-throat field that your livelihood is in jeopardy if your connections are revealed, by all means, make this private. However, keep in mind, if everyone locked down this setting, networking on LinkedIn would be severely thwarted.

Change your photo profile and visibility.
This is a non-negotiable: your photo should be viewable for “everyone.” Otherwise, people who may want to learn more about you may be discouraged from reaching out because they see the default “shadow face” LinkedIn inserts in lieu of a picture.

Don’t forget to keep an eye on privacy settings; don’t set them and forget them. Be vigilant and make sure your settings match your goals, and you’ll be more likely to win new opportunities.

Originally appeared on AOLJobs.com.

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How to be appreciated at work http://www.keppiecareers.com/how-to-be-appreciated-at-work/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/how-to-be-appreciated-at-work/#comments Tue, 08 Jul 2014 10:30:57 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=11950 Many people feel underappreciated at work. Why? Perhaps the organization does not have a culture that promotes appreciation. Maybe everyone constantly feels under the gun and no one has time to stop and say thank you. You may ask, “How...

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file3831269347533Many people feel underappreciated at work. Why? Perhaps the organization does not have a culture that promotes appreciation. Maybe everyone constantly feels under the gun and no one has time to stop and say thank you. You may ask, “How long does it take to say thank you?”

The reality is, in many workplaces, “thank you” is not automatic, and cannot be expected. In the cut-throat environment where many people toil away every day, it takes a lot more than a job well done to attain the acknowledgement or reward you’d like to see.

Here are tips to get the recognition you deserve when you feel underappreciated at work. (Tweet this thought.)

Identify the stars at your organization and follow their leads. 

Once you figure out who’s doing a great job getting recognition at your workplace, you can leverage that knowledge for your own benefit. Did someone get a huge shout out at the last staff meeting?

Why?

Identify key factors that often lead to recognition. For example, what accomplishment led to the appreciation? Perhaps the organization has more of a tendency to appreciate extra effort; is going above and beyond the call of duty needed to attract appreciation? Is someone appreciated in your office because he or she is a really helpful person to have around in a crisis?

Different organizations value different characteristics at work. Once you see where the bar is set in your organization for recognition, you know what you need to strive to achieve.

Offer insights instead of complaining. 

No one likes a complainer. Like it or not, if you have a reputation for always being a downer at work, it’s going to be difficult to achieve much in the way of recognition. That’s not to say you necessarily have to be a “yes man or woman,” either. Be aware of your attitude and keep it in check if you have a tendency to spout off about every single thing that annoys you. That includes comments on social media, especially if you are connected in any way to anyone connected to your workplace.

Keep in mind: your privacy settings are only as good as your least loose-lipped friend.

Be a problem solver. 

What’s the biggest problem your organization or team faces right now? If you can help take major steps to help solve the problem, or come up with a way to solve it altogether, you will earn recognition. If you still don’t feel appreciated, you may be in the wrong job.

Network in and outside of the office. 

Sometimes, appreciation comes hand-in-hand with relationships. If you’ve been skipping team nights out or prefer to lunch alone, maybe it’s time to make a change and to try to get to know some of the people at work. If you’re not a social person, consider it research instead of socializing. Make it your business to determine what’s most important (in and outside of the office) to your colleagues – and your boss, if possible. You may be surprised to find that a few well-placed lunch appointments can yield interesting information that may help you attract the appreciation you deserve.

Join professional or volunteer organizations. 

While it may not specifically land you appreciation AT work, when you volunteer for your professional association, it’s very likely you’ll have an opportunity to receive some kudos and the “thank you’s” you want at work. A side benefit, you’ll have the opportunity to network with people who can get to know you and your work ethic. Those contacts are key when it’s time to find a new job.

Ask for it. 

While it’s not ideal, perhaps you need to ask for recognition in your workplace. That includes requesting a promotion, a raise or other benefits when appropriate. (Such as after a huge win.) If you don’t get any feedback at all from your boss, request a review. Create a list of your accomplishments and ask for what you want.

It’s possible that you work in a place where the culture is to believe providing a paycheck is thank you enough. If that’s not a good fit for you, after you’ve taken these steps and still aren’t satisfied, it’s time to find a new job where you’ll feel more appreciated.

Originally appeared on AOLJobs.com.

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Can you say no to your boss? http://www.keppiecareers.com/can-say-boss/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/can-say-boss/#comments Thu, 03 Jul 2014 10:30:34 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=11947 Are you the “yes man or woman” at work? Whenever your boss or a colleague needs anything, your name is at the tip of his or her tongue? If you are the go-to person at work when someone needs a “yes,” congratulations!...

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Screen Shot 2014-07-03 at 10.38.49 PMAre you the “yes man or woman” at work? Whenever your boss or a colleague needs anything, your name is at the tip of his or her tongue? If you are the go-to person at work when someone needs a “yes,” congratulations! You’ve likely secured your place in the office. Who wants to lay off the person who can never say no? On the other hand, it’s likely you put yourself (and probably non-work relationships) at risk in favor of doing whatever is necessary for your career. That could be a big mistake.

How can you find a balance between maintaining your indispensable status at work and your sanity? Unfortunately, there are no easy answers. Everyone’s circumstances are different, and if you work in a place where you’re only as good as the last thing you’ve done, not all of this advice may work for you. However, in many cases, once you’ve created a reputation for being helpful and agreeable, carefully choosing times to say “no” may not hurt your work reputation, and may actually earn you additional respect.

How can you say no without risking it all at work?

Choose the situation carefully.

If everyone is stressed to the hilt, you’re up for a promotion and the boss comes to you with a desperate request for help, it’s probably not the time to decide you’re going to change your reputation as the “can-do” person in the office. On the other hand, if things are a bit more stable, and it seems like there are plenty of people who could help out, you should have more leeway to indicate if your plate is already full. See the following suggestions for ideas to say no instead of yes.

Learn to say no, without saying no.

Perhaps your boss forgot about all of the other crucial work you are doing. Instead of saying, “No, I cannot take on one more project,” say, “I can see how important this project is. Can we sit down for a few minutes so you can help me prioritize my work? I want to be sure to focus on the most important things.”

In this meeting, make sure you don’t forget to include any key projects (or even day-to-day work) you’re managing. If you can make a solid case indicating that you really don’t have time to handle another thing, it’s possible you can say “no” without actually uttering those words.

Suggest an alternate solution.

Perhaps you are too busy to take on the work by yourself, but you can handle one part of the project. If you have a specialty area (for example, you’re the best at analyzing data), suggest that you could manage that piece of the project in partnership with someone who specializes in the research piece.

No doubt, this is a tricky conversation, as you are trying to deflect pieces of a project away from you. However, if you maintain an enthusiastic, “can do” approach and communicate in a way that will resonate with your boss, it’s possible you can trick him or her into thinking you’re still saying “yes,” even though you are really saying “no.”

Put your foot down, but have a really good reason.

What qualifies as a “good reason” will vary from office to office. Condolences to you if you work in a place where there are no good reasons – perhaps you are in the wrong job and it is time to look for a new job that values your time outside of work.

If you already have planned time off to attend a family wedding or your child’s graduation, and this new project will interfere with that, you may choose to tell your boss you cannot help. Ideally, you won’t lead the conversation with the word “no.” Instead, choose your words carefully, remind your supervisor that you always like to say yes, but the circumstances this time mean you’d like to help by coming up with another solution.

Originally appeared on AOLJobs.com.

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What NOT to say at a job interview http://www.keppiecareers.com/say-job-interview/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/say-job-interview/#comments Tue, 01 Jul 2014 10:30:26 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=11945 Interviews. They’re a necessary evil for both job seekers and employers; no one seems to love them. There’s lots of advice out there about what to say and what not to say in an interview. Today, we’re going to explore...

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Screen Shot 2014-07-03 at 10.34.28 PMInterviews. They’re a necessary evil for both job seekers and employers; no one seems to love them. There’s lots of advice out there about what to say and what not to say in an interview. Today, we’re going to explore the topic of what you wish you COULD say in an interview, but shouldn’t – that is, if you want the job.

Why do you think I am looking for a job? My boss is a real jerk.

It’s common knowledge that one of the biggest reasons people leave their jobs is because their boss or manager is difficult (at best) or horrible (at worst). The interviewer may even assume you have a bad boss. But, that doesn’t give you the green light to say anything about it.

Why? Because no one wants to hire the person who is going to be bad mouthing him or her in another year’s time. Dissing your current or recent boss is a big mistake. It’s a huge red flag that is unlikely overlooked in the hiring process. Throw your boss under the bus (figuratively) and you can kiss the new job potential goodbye.

You will not believe the things going on behind the scenes at my job. My employer makes T.V. shows like Scandal seem tame.

If you’re effectively fleeing a shady operation, a toxic workplace or your employer regularly seems to sidestep ethics in favor of profit, it’s great that you’re interviewing. What is not great is if you discuss your experiences with your interviewer.

That’s not to say you should never consider being a whistle blower. Although, you wouldn’t want to take on that role without first considering all of the possible ramifications, and consulting an attorney. It’s just that spilling your guts about all the wrongdoing at your current or past office, even in hushed tones, while looking behind you to see if anyone else can hear what you’re saying, is bad form for an interview.

Could you BE less prepared for this interview?

Career coaches are always harping on how important it is for job seekers to be prepared for interviews. Meanwhile, many employers, especially the ones who don’t have many opportunities to interview candidates, often seem totally clueless when it comes to what to ask. Some don’t appear to have even reviewed your resume. What a waste of time!

However, your best recourse is to take advantage of an unprepared interviewer and volunteer information you want him or her to know. Do not wait for someone to ask you about the best accomplishment that qualifies you for the position – you make sure to fit it into the conversation. And, no – you can’t suggest the interviewer may want to prepare better the next time if you want a chance to advance in the process.

I know you aren’t going to hire me because I’m twice your age.

Ageism is alive and well, but it doesn’t mean you can’t get a job with a younger boss. If you could be the interviewer’s mom, it’s likely clear to everyone in the room. Instead of focusing on the age difference, make a point to avoid highlighting the generational gap. For example, also avoid colloquialisms such as, “When I was your age” or “Back in my day.”

Let’s cut to the chase: what does this job pay?

It would save so much time if employers and candidate could always be upfront about salary expectations. Unfortunately, it’s usually a guessing game, where each sizes up the other and hopes for the best. Under most circumstances, it is not appropriate to bring up salary until you’re offered the job, so this is just one more on the list of things you wish you could say at the interview.

If you have a lot of hostility or secrets to keep while you’re interviewing, consider practicing what NOT to say as equal in importance as planning what TO say at an interview. You’ll be glad you did.

Originally appeared on AOLJobs.com.

 

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How to get an internal transfer http://www.keppiecareers.com/how-to-get-an-internal-transfer/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/how-to-get-an-internal-transfer/#comments Thu, 26 Jun 2014 10:30:27 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=11943 You may want to move on from your current job, but perhaps you are not aware that your best chance for a new job is to apply for an internal position. Many companies prefer to hire from within. Doing so...

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file0001269421632You may want to move on from your current job, but perhaps you are not aware that your best chance for a new job is to apply for an internal position. Many companies prefer to hire from within. Doing so not only means keeping an employee they like, it helps ensure any investment in training provided that individual stays at the organization and doesn’t benefit a competitor.

What’s the best way to apply to a job inside your company?

Find opportunities.

Your company likely posts positions on its website, but it may also list opportunities internally before advertising to outsiders. If you don’t already know exactly how positions are posted, finding out should be your first priority. In this exploratory stage, you may not want to announce your intentions to everyone in the office, or to your boss, but a quick search on your company’s website or a review of the employee handbook should provide the information you need about how to identify internal opportunities.

Don’t forget to follow your own company on LinkedIn if it maintains a presence there, as it can be a great way to find out information about new job opportunities you may have missed.

Research your organization.

What kind of people does your company seem to like? You can learn a lot by talking to others who have worked in the organization a long time. What have their career paths been? Ask about their moves from one job to the next. Were they promoted? Did they take lateral moves to other departments? How supportive (or not) were their supervisors? Were there programs at the company they tapped into to help them plan and navigate their careers? Asking these and other questions can help you understand your organization’s approach to internal transfers.

Prepare to explain your goals.

When you’re seeking a promotion, it’s easy to explain why you want to move from the job you have to the better opportunity. However, you may be considering a lateral move that doesn’t come with more money or prestige. If that’s the case, be ready to explain your motivations. Realistically, your goal may be to move away from a difficult boss, or perhaps you’re hoping a new department won’t expect you to work so many hours. Neither of these reasons are compelling from the institution’s perspective, so be sure you plan a reasonable explanation that seems like a win-win. For example, you may explain that you want your skills to be more well rounded to enhance your ability to work with clients. Or, you have a very strong interest inmarketing and believe your customer service background and skills provide a good foundation for being successful in the new department.

Talk to your supervisor.

Once you identify why you are motivated to look for a different position inside the company, and have seen at least one position that interests you, it’s time to speak to your supervisor. Explain your goals and ask your boss to support your career plans. Keep the conversation very positive; do not indicate your desire to move reflects poorly on his or her leadership. Even if it does, it is not likely to help your case by sharing your feelings.

Apply for the job.

Yes, you can use your company email to apply for an internal position. Depending on the process, it may be the only thing that differentiates you from other applicants and will alert hiring managers that you’re applying from within.

Even though you should have an advantage, don’t rely on your internal candidacy to make the case for winning the job. Compose well-written and thought out application materials that describe why you are a good fit and how your accomplishments support your ability to do a great job in the proposed role. From the point of applying on, prepare and act as you would if you were seeking an external job. Take the process very seriously and plan ahead what you will say in an interview. Since you’re an internal candidate, there’s even more pressure on you to be able to describe how you can help the organization in the new role. Use every resource at your disposal to make a great case, and you could be moving offices before you know it.

Originally appeared on AOLjobs.com.

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