Keppie Careers http://www.keppiecareers.com Social media speaker, social media consultant, job search coach Fri, 27 Mar 2015 10:30:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.5 5 tips to achieve work-life balance http://www.keppiecareers.com/5-tips-achieve-work-life-balance/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/5-tips-achieve-work-life-balance/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 10:30:59 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=12418 Work-life balance is a topic on the minds of many professionals and job seekers. WorkplaceTrends.com, a research and advisory membership service for forward-thinking human resources professionals, and CareerArc, a global recruitment and outplacement firm, recently announced the results of the...

The post 5 tips to achieve work-life balance appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
Resolution - better time managementWork-life balance is a topic on the minds of many professionals and job seekers. WorkplaceTrends.com, a research and advisory membership service for forward-thinking human resources professionals, and CareerArc, a global recruitment and outplacement firm, recently announced the results of the 2015 Workplace Flexibility Study. They surveyed 1,087 professionals nationally, both employed and unemployed, and 116 HR professionals.

Interestingly, 67 percent of human resources professionals think their employees have a balanced work life, yet 45 percent of employees believe they don’t have enough time each week to handle their personal business. Plus, 20 percent of employees surveyed spend more than 20 hours per week working during their own time.

Yair Riemer, chief marketing officer of CareerArc, suggests the following tips to help employees achieve work-life balance while reducing stress and increasing productivity.

1. Prioritize, prioritize, prioritize. “Prioritization is the key to success and is a lesson that can be applied across a wide variety of industries – not just startups where product and engineering teams often prioritize tasks weekly,” Riemer says. When you identify the most important items on your to-do list, it’s easier to know where to start and when you can finish for the day or week. Prioritization helps you focus on what is really important and decreases unnecessary stress that comes with an urgent focus on less timely or unimportant tasks.

It’s a good idea to touch base with your supervisor if you have multiple projects and need help deciding which one is most important.

2. Be proactive – not reactive. “When you’re reactive, you lose touch with what’s really important,” Riemer says. “And thus, you fail to operate at peak capacity, causing stress.” When you take the time and effort to plan ahead and anticipate what your colleagues or managers may request, you’ll be better prepared to juggle multiple tasks and schedule your time. “With your schedule planned, you can attack those tasks proactively, rather than waiting for external inputs to land on your desk, increasing your stress levels and leaving you overwhelmed,” he says. Hopefully, this will prevent you from bringing a lot of work home on a regular basis.

3. Use your vacation. The average American takes only about half their paid time off per year. “That’s not enough time to recharge,” Riemer says.

Plus, studies show that many workers don’t disconnect from work, even when they’re on vacation. They are still glued to their devices and screens to check work email and keep up with colleagues. Riemer believes taking a vacation and truly disconnecting is key to recharging and getting re-energized once back at the office.

4. Trust in your peers. “The best managers trust their employees, and the best employees have trust in their company’s leadership,” Riemer says. “If you believe in your colleagues – in their intellect, in their work ethic, in their skill set – then share the load.” Even if you believe you have to do everything yourself, it’s unlikely you’re expected to carry the entire burden at the expense of all of your personal time.

If you work with a team, be sure to collaborate on projects, and don’t own tasks for the sake of ownership. “You may be a Type A perfectionist or love control, but winning organizations are made up of teammates, not individuals,” he says. “Your work-life balance will improve significantly with a little bit of help from your friends.”

Get my free white paper: 5 Mistakes Preventing You From Landing a Job This Week 

5. Exercise. Don’t put off taking care of yourself. You don’t need a gym membership or fancy equipment to exercise. Even a brisk walk in the morning or at lunchtime can be invigorating and help clear your mind. “Research shows regular exercise helps keep you clear-headed, which improves control of work-life balance, reduces stress and increases self-efficacy,” Riemer says.

The 2015 Workplace Flexibility Study found that 75 percent of employees ranked workplace flexibility as their top desired benefit. Whether or not your employer is actively seeking ways to enhance your flexibility, use these steps to protect your personal time and to make an effort to tip the balance in your work-life hours.

Appeared on U.S. News & World Report.

The post 5 tips to achieve work-life balance appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.keppiecareers.com/5-tips-achieve-work-life-balance/feed/ 0
April Fool’s pranks for work http://www.keppiecareers.com/april-fools-pranks-work/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/april-fools-pranks-work/#comments Wed, 25 Mar 2015 10:30:55 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=11964 Are you already plotting and planning your workplace April Fool’s Day pranks? Or, are you the butt of the jokes – the one always on the receiving end of every prankster with an idea? If you’re considering pulling a big...

The post April Fool’s pranks for work appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
file7811297827424Are you already plotting and planning your workplace April Fool’s Day pranks? Or, are you the butt of the jokes – the one always on the receiving end of every prankster with an idea?

If you’re considering pulling a big prank at work, you may want to think twice. A national survey by a recruitment firm found 68% of advertising and marketing executives think April Fools’ pranks are inappropriate for the workplace. While under the guise of “team building,” certain pranks cause more harm than good. Even if your corporate or office culture embraces jokes, be aware that a misstep, even if intended all in fun, can mean you’re looking for a new job if someone takes it the wrong way, or if things go too far.

How can you evaluate a workplace prank?

Don’t be a bully. 

Every office has a few known misfits – people who don’t seem to mesh with the rest of the crowd. Choosing these teammates to be on the receiving end of your prank isn’t funny, it’s mean spirited and potentially cruel. Picking on someone known to be an outsider puts you on the same level of the grade-school bully who takes lunches from weaker kids on the bus.

Resist the urge to do anything that could cause permanent harm.

While changing a meeting time on someone’s calendar to cause them to miss an appointment may seem casual or harmless, if the event was important, the prank may escalate from mirthful to consequential very quickly.

Avoid gags that could be considered offensive. 

Stay away from anything that could be interpreted as targeted at any group or could be considered harassment. Making fun of people based on their race, religion or sexual orientation is never appropriate. Anything sexual in nature at all (a stripper, for example) is crossing the line in the office and could result in harassment charges.

Know your audience. 

If your target is the one who normally plans office pranks, and gags are common in your workplace, you’re less likely to be met with resistance, and your prank may be well received. If you work in a place where fun comes first, a well-played practical joke may be a welcome distraction. On the other hand, if it’s a buttoned-up work environment or clients frequent the office, you may want to think twice (or three times) before breaking the company’s culture with an April Fool’s joke.

Consider social media’s potential to extend – or ruin – your harmless prank. 

Maybe making your boss look a little silly won’t get you fired (if you’re lucky). However, making your boss look silly, filming it and posting it on the company’s YouTube channel or Twitter feed may very well result in termination. Be aware of the ramifications of what you do and how a single photo posted on Facebook can affect someone’s career.

“Safer” work gags.

There’s no dearth of ideas online for practical jokes at work. If you must break the monotony at work and have considered your plans in the context of advice to evaluate a workplace prank, choose something that won’t hurt anyone’s feelings and that leaves everyone involved thinking, “That was funny.”

Here are a few April Fool’s Day pranks unlikely to hurt anyone, but proceed at your own risk. 

  • Mashable suggested arranging for co-workers to each bring in several changes of clothing, and to update their outfits throughout the day. While it could make a very tired co-worker think he is going crazy, it’s unlikely to cause any real harm.
  • Put “Out of Order” signs on bathroom doors or on other “important” devices, such as the coffee pot or microwave.
  • Foil” or “wrap” someone’s office. Before you start, be sure he or she doesn’t have an important meeting first thing in the morning, and then cover everything in the office.
  • The old “fill the drawers” trick. Ping pong balls in every drawer will be inconvenient, but is unlikely to cause any real damage.
  • Balloon an office. It can be a challenge to fill an office with balloons, and clean up may be a pain, but it can be a fun –- and colorful –- prank to spice up the day.

Get my free white paper: 5 Mistakes Preventing You From Landing a Job This Week 

If you do choose to proceed with a prank, make sure to be careful and keep the end goal in mind. You want everyone remembering the prank as being fun and clever, not nasty and mean spirited.

Originally appeared on AOLJobs.com.

The post April Fool’s pranks for work appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.keppiecareers.com/april-fools-pranks-work/feed/ 0
Never say these things in interviews http://www.keppiecareers.com/never-say-things-interviews/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/never-say-things-interviews/#comments Tue, 24 Mar 2015 10:30:05 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=12431 Interviews are probably the most challenging part of the job search process. You need to be ready for anything, including weird interview questions. You don’t want to blurt out something inappropriate and send all of your hard work down the toilet....

The post Never say these things in interviews appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photo-job-interview-sticky-notes-image28983875Interviews are probably the most challenging part of the job search process. You need to be ready for anything, including weird interview questions. You don’t want to blurt out something inappropriate and send all of your hard work down the toilet. Avoid these inappropriate comments during your interview:

1. I’m really nervous. There’s nothing wrong with feeling nervous. It’s natural to be a little uneasy at an important interview. Don’t tell the interviewer if you have butterflies in your stomach, though. Your job in the interview is to portray a confident and professional demeanor. You won’t win any points by admitting your nerves or blaming them for any failures in your performance.

2. I don’t really know much about the job; I thought you’d tell me all about it. This is a big job seeker mistake, and it can cost you the opportunity. Employers spend a lot of time interviewing, and they expect candidates to have researched the jobs enough to be able to explain why they want the positions. Otherwise, you could be wasting everyone’s time by interviewing for a job you may not even really want. Asking questions is important, but don’t ask anything you should know from the job description or from reading about the company online.

3. My last boss/colleague/client was a real jerk. It’s possible (even likely) that your interviewer could prod you into telling tales about your previous or current supervisor or work environment. Resist the urge to badmouth anyone, even if you have a bad boss. It is unprofessional and the employer will worry what you may say to someone about him or her down the road. Instead, think about ways to describe past work environments in terms of what you learned or accomplishments you’re proud to discuss.

4. My biggest weakness is (something directly related to the job). ”What’s your weakness?” is one of the most dreaded interview questions. There’s no perfect reply, but there is a reply you should never say: Never admit to a weakness that will affect your ability to get the job done. If the job description requires a lot of creativity, and you say your creativity has waned lately, assume that you’ve taken yourself out of the running. Choose a weakness not related to the position and explain how you’re working to improve it.

5. @#$%! Granted, profanity seems to be much more accepted in many workplaces today. However, an interview is not the time to demonstrate that you can talk like a pirate.

6. Just a minute; I really need to get this call. It’s amazing how many hiring managers and recruiters report that interviewees answer their phones and respond to text messages during in-person interviews. Turn off your phone during interviews and you will not be tempted to reach to answer it.

7. How much vacation time would I get? Never, ever ask questions in an interview that may make it appear that you’ll be overly focused on anything other than work.

8. Can I work from home? Even if you’re pretty sure the company has a lenient work-from-home policy, the interview isn’t the best time to ask about it.

Get my free white paper: 5 Mistakes Preventing You From Landing a Job This Week 

9. Family is the most important thing to me. This is true for many people. However, you do not need to explain how devoted you are to your family during your job interview. It is unlikely to win favor, even in organizations with a well-known family-friendly environment. You want your potential employer to envision you being totally devoted to his or her needs.

When in doubt, pause before you say what’s on your mind. If you wonder if it’s okay to ask, assume it’s better to avoid the topic altogether.

Appeared on AOLjobs.com.

The post Never say these things in interviews appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.keppiecareers.com/never-say-things-interviews/feed/ 0
How social media can help you get a job http://www.keppiecareers.com/social-media-can-help-get-job/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/social-media-can-help-get-job/#comments Fri, 20 Mar 2015 10:30:31 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=12424 In light of research released from Jobvite regarding how employers are using social media tools to source and hire candidates, I thought it would be helpful to provide ideas and insight about how to use the data from the survey directly from...

The post How social media can help you get a job appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photo-people-social-networking-computer-network-concepts-image41603635In light of research released from Jobvite regarding how employers are using social media tools to source and hire candidates, I thought it would be helpful to provide ideas and insight about how to use the data from the survey directly from a recruiter.

Jackie Hydock is Director, Global Recruiting at App Annie. The organization taps social media tools to recruit, and she made the following suggestions regarding how job seekers can use social media effectively:

Survey data say recruiters appreciate when candidates post content on their own social media sites, but what about what they should post on employer sites? Do candidates ever post on App Annie’s social media pages? If so, what are some things you appreciate seeing or take as a positive sign?

Jackie: Yes. We have created our own recruitment social media pages outside of our corporate social media sites. The corporate sites serve to share our mobile insights reports, corporate news and showcase how we are revolutionizing the mobile analytics space. Our recruitment social media sites focus on the App Annie culture to give followers an inside view of what it’s like to be a part of the team and offer tips on how to become an “App Annier.” We also use our recruitment social sites to highlight open job positions.

We love gaining new candidate followers and appreciate it when followers like, comment, retweet or favorite our #lifeatappannie and App Annie Instagram posts. A couple of candidates have tweeted that they sent in their application to App Annie and couldn’t wait to hear from us! It’s also exciting when followers retweet or favorite specific job openings. Engaging with us through our social media channels is a great way to stand out among the applicant pool. It shows us that candidates have taken the time to learn more about our company’s cultures, values and beliefs, which is an integral part of our recruiting process. If a candidate is already a user of our App Annie products and broadcasts that on social media — that’s another major plus in our eyes.

What kinds of social media engagement do you appreciate seeing? For example, do you appreciate if a candidate follows you, likes a post, makes a comment, etc.

Jackie: Any attention a candidate gives to our corporate or recruiting social sites makes us feel like they are eager to stay connected and that they want to engage with us. We appreciate the candidates who take time to follow us, whether they are interested in working with us today or just hoping to keep us in mind for the future. If a candidate goes the extra mile to share a job opening with their network, it is a great sign that they would be a positive addition to our growing team. It is our commitment to our followers to keep our feeds interesting and filled with fun and unique App Annie content.

What do you like to see on candidates’ social media profiles? When you look on a candidate’s LinkedIn, Twitter or Facebook page, what are some things that impress you or make you think favorably of a candidate?

Get my free white paper: 5 Mistakes Preventing You From Landing a Job This Week 

Jackie: We like to see responsible photos and content from people who take their personal brand image and work seriously. Our recruiting team uses LinkedIn heavily and we believe that it is the best place to judge candidates on who they are and what they’ve done in a public forum. We understand that Facebook and Instagram profiles are typically more personal profiles and we are less likely to take those posts and pictures under consideration.

What we are looking for is good judgment. As we recruit, we keep in mind that every App Annie employee is also an App Annie brand ambassador, and we want to make sure our team is made up of those who will reflect our company in the most positive light everywhere – whether they’re on the conference show floor or in the gym. We don’t invest a lot of time in doing heavy social checks on the more personal social media channels, but rely on more formal background checks to assess a candidate’s ultimate eligibility.

Appeared on AOLJobs.com.

The post How social media can help you get a job appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.keppiecareers.com/social-media-can-help-get-job/feed/ 0
Kick start your job search http://www.keppiecareers.com/kick-start-job-search/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/kick-start-job-search/#comments Wed, 18 Mar 2015 10:30:26 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=12416 No one said looking for a job was easy, but if you keep certain advice in mind, it can be much easier to successfully land an opportunity. Rachel Elahee, psychologist and author of “Choose You! Reignite Your Passion For Life,” offers the following...

The post Kick start your job search appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photos-future-action-thinking-actions-regarding-life-career-image39521718No one said looking for a job was easy, but if you keep certain advice in mind, it can be much easier to successfully land an opportunity. Rachel Elahee, psychologist and author of “Choose You! Reignite Your Passion For Life,” offers the following suggestions adapted from the book to help you make the best choices during your job search.

1. Your life is not a democracy. “When it comes to the opinions of others, majority does not rule,” Elahee says. ”Let others’ opinions remain their opinions only and not the linchpin that your life becomes contingent upon.”

While you may ask your colleagues, friends and family for advice and assistance, make sure they do not insert their agendas into your life without your approval. While you may be vulnerable at this time, keep your eyes on your target and goals, and you’ll be less likely to veer from your chosen professional path. “Consider opinions and advice, but do not let your life be dictated by them,” Elahee says.

2. Ask yourself: “Are you living accidentally or intentionally?” “Accidental living is reactive,” Elahee says. ”Intentional living is living with a plan, and that plan includes a contingency plan.”

She reminds job seekers that planning things intentionally helps increase the likelihood that you’ll achieve your goal in a timely way. The other option is to wait until you’re accidentally in the right place, at the right time, which could take forever. “If you’re going to be serious about job hunting, you have to plan and be strategic,” she says. “Don’t sit waiting for the phone to ring. Be laser-focused about this project as if it is your most important assignment you have ever had.”

3. Do not take “no” personally. One thing most job seekers can expect is rejection. Even if you do everything else right, you’re likely to be turned away and told “no” during your search. “Most likely, it is not about you. A ‘no’ only means, ‘no’ to your request or ‘not right now’ in many cases. It does not mean the person does not like you,” Elahee says. “’No’ does not mean you are not intelligent. It does not mean your idea is ridiculous. It does not you will never get a job, or there is something wrong with you, or any other catastrophic result.”

Elahee suggests you (politely) ask the reason for the “no,” and ask if it’s OK for you to check in with the contact or employer again in a certain period of time. “Regardless of which choice you make, lighten up,” she says, “The ‘no’ is not always about you.”

4. Get in position, and be patient. You need to position yourself for the opportunity you want. “When a young child excitedly anticipates something they want, they run to get into position. When my toddler wants milk, dinner, snacks or a toy, I tell him to go get in his high chair, for example,” she says. “When you are seeking a job, even before you get one, you have to get in position to receive it.”

You have to prepare while anticipating its arrival. For example, will you need to train in new skills to be well qualified for your target job? Do you need to expand your network so you’ll have a better chance of meeting the person who can introduce you to an employer at your target company? Don’t just sit there – get in position to accomplish your goals. Take the steps to make sure you are successful, whether that means signing up for classes, joining and becoming active in new social networking groups or attending more in-person networking events.

5. Be able to answer the question, “who are you?” Our jobs are so much a part of our identities that it’s not uncommon for people who are between positions to feel disconnected from who they are. Elahee suggests you think differently. “Your job is what you do. Your job is not who you are. When your sense of self is tied to your occupation, it is easy to lose sight of who you are when you are unemployed,” she says. “To combat this phenomenon, write a list of your life roles, excluding your former jobs or positions. In this list, you may identify yourself as a friend, husband, wife, sister, brother, lover of music, chess player, etc. Remember: You are not your job title.”

Get my free white paper: 5 Mistakes Preventing You From Landing a Job This Week 

When you’re able to separate who you are from what you do, you’ll have a better chance of successfully identifying the best professional course for you, and you’ll be better prepared to engage fully in all of the activities you need to accomplish in order to land a new opportunity.

Originally appeared on U.S. News & World Reports.

The post Kick start your job search appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.keppiecareers.com/kick-start-job-search/feed/ 0
How to prove to employers you’re a catch http://www.keppiecareers.com/prove-employers-youre-catch/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/prove-employers-youre-catch/#comments Mon, 16 Mar 2015 10:30:29 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=12317 In a survey of millennials and hiring managers commissioned by Elance-oDesk and Millennial Branding, Jaleh Bisharat, Elance-oDesk senior vice president of marketing, and Dan Schawbel, Millennial Branding managing partner, showcase how professionals can thrive as millennials tip the scales as the largest workforce generation next...

The post How to prove to employers you’re a catch appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-image-skills-word-sphere-ball-required-experience-job-career-to-illustrate-many-different-skillsets-knowledge-training-image35557201In a survey of millennials and hiring managers commissioned by Elance-oDesk and Millennial Branding, Jaleh Bisharat, Elance-oDesk senior vice president of marketing, and Dan Schawbel, Millennial Branding managing partner, showcase how professionals can thrive as millennials tip the scales as the largest workforce generation next year.

Bisharat and Schawbel offered the following analysis and suggestions for succeeding in the workforce:

1. Focus on hard skills. “A majority of hiring managers (55 percent) revealed they prioritize hard skills over personality (21%) when hiring,” Bisharat notes. ”With the rapidly changing tech landscape and a persisting skills gap, it is more important than ever for businesses to find people with the specific skills they need to deliver results.”

Employers will appreciate your efforts. “Whether you’re a millennial or a more seasoned professional, there’s no excuse not to keep up to date on skills relevant in your field,” Schawbel adds. ”With free and low-cost online learning platforms like Coursera and Lynda boasting courses ranging from Photoshop for beginners to the ins and outs of Bitcoin, a world’s worth of hard skills are at your fingertips.”

2. Be the change you want to see. Millennials are known for innovation. The survey notes that hiring managers believe millennials are open to change (72 percent), creative (66 percent) and adaptable (65 percent) – far outranking their Gen X counterparts for these desirable traits.

“Many companies still run up against the digital divide and shrink from pushing past the old way of doing things. That’s why, if you’re a millennial, you should play up your unique ‘digital native’ talents (real and perceived) to spur innovation on your teams,” Schawbel says. ”Companies are hungry for new ideas, and while millennials are champions of change, all professionals should strive for adaptability.”

3. Prove you’re a team player. While they appreciate seeing specific “hard” skills on résumés, more and more employers are considering the work culture they wish to develop and seeking team players to create it. “Although millennials are seen as providing critical advantages thanks to their fresh thinking and entrepreneurialism, findings of our study showed that, when asked which generation was more likely to be team players, only 27 percent of hiring managers chose millennials rather than Gen X,” Bisharat explains. “This perception, whether reality or not, is a demerit that can slow career growth. If you’re a member of this youngest generation of professionals, make sure to develop teamwork skills to prove this impression wrong. If you’re a more established professional, be open to working closely with and mentoring millennials.”

4. Stand out as a “loyalist.” No doubt, employer loyalty is waning with good reason. All employees are realizing that they cannot count on a corporate entity to return the favor. Despite this, it’s helpful to be able to tap into your passion and interest for an organization. “Simply showing you are dedicated can help you build trust with your team and organization,” Schawbel says. ”With 58 percent of millennials reporting they expect to be in their job fewer than three years, displays of loyalty will certainly nudge employers to invest in your professional future.”

Get my free white paper: 5 Mistakes Preventing You From Landing a Job This Week 

5. Consider alternative paths. While it’s great to be able to articulate and demonstrate your interest in a particular company, facts are facts. The majority of employees will not be able to expect to stay in one job for many years, and being agile and flexible enough to shift – even to an entrepreneurial path – will be key to success for many workers.

“Even if you venture out on your own, you will never be successful without involving others.” Bisharat explains. ”Sara Horowitz, founder of Freelancers Union, believes freelancing is all about networking. She says, ‘Freelancing successfully means building a network to line up new gigs, passing assignments to others when things are busy and getting referrals from friends when they’re not.’ You never know when these connections will turn into opportunities down the road.”

Originally appeared on U.S. News & World Report.

The post How to prove to employers you’re a catch appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.keppiecareers.com/prove-employers-youre-catch/feed/ 0
What NOT to do when you start a new job http://www.keppiecareers.com/not-start-new-job/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/not-start-new-job/#comments Fri, 13 Mar 2015 10:30:48 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=12435 You’re starting a new job. How can you avoid getting off on the wrong foot? Avoid the following and you’ll be more likely to have a job next week. Don’t wear an outfit if you have to check with your...

The post What NOT to do when you start a new job appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photography-business-office-workplace-flat-design-style-infographic-computer-monitor-vector-illustration-presentation-booklet-image40921442You’re starting a new job. How can you avoid getting off on the wrong foot? Avoid the following and you’ll be more likely to have a job next week.

Don’t wear an outfit if you have to check with your friends first to see if it will be “okay.” Hopefully, you have a good idea of the office dress code. However, some workplaces support very casual attire, and you may be tempted to sport something that is a little too casual. If you’re tempted to call a friend to ask if he or she thinks you can get away with wearing your new tank top or your perfectly torn jeans, think again. It doesn’t hurt to dress up a little when you start your new job. Plan everything in advance, as you would for an interview, so you will be comfortable and suitably attired from the start.

Don’t be late. Perhaps there is a lot of traffic, but there are no excuses for being late your first week. If you have to arrange to be early (even very early) to ensure getting there on time, do it. Do not put yourself in a position of offering excuses for being late on the first day because you didn’t understand the traffic patterns. “The early bird gets the worm” isn’t just a trite cliche; it’s a reminder that when you appear prepared and ready, you’ll put yourself in a position to succeed.

Don’t flub your introductions. Think beyond “My name is…” Be sure you can explain who you are and what you do! What do you want them to remember about you? What do you want to be known for? Be sure to work on your eye contact, a pleasant smile and a firm handshake. All of this will contribute to the first impression that your colleagues have of you.

Don’t forget your colleagues’ names. Don’t be the one who tells everyone you’re “not good with names.” Maybe you really aren’t good with names. However, your job is to become better at it before you embarrass yourself and forget your boss’ name. A few tips: Use people’s names as soon as they are introduced. Say, “Nice to meet you, Sara.” If you didn’t catch the name, or are unsure of the pronunciation, ask the person to repeat his or her name, and make a real effort to learn it. Take notes so you’ll remember people later. For example, jot down something to help you match a new colleague’s name and face. Another trick? Make an association with the person’s name. If Tom is tall, think, “Tall Tom” and you’re more likely to remember it later.

Get my free white paper: 5 Mistakes Preventing You From Landing a Job This Week 

Don’t be a slob. If your co-workers start to question their choice in hiring you the minute you dump your things all over your desk, beware! Look around to see how other people organize their areas. If no one else has personal items or photos out, consider keeping your area clear of those types of things. Don’t leave your food out or extend your personal items into anyone else’s space.

Don’t make a big decision without asking a question. If you’re of the mind that it’s “better to ask forgiveness than permission,” think again. When you’re new at a job, ask before you do anything significant for the first time. Don’t make executive decisions that otherwise wouldn’t be your call. Keep your questions to things that you are curious about and try to save the “Why do you do it that way instead of this other way?” types of inquiries for later on.

Don’t eat the pudding from the refrigerator. You know how possessive people can be about their food! Do not take anything that doesn’t belong to you, or you could risk wrath that might impede your career path.

Avoid loud phone conversations. In the “open” workspaces so common today, it’s virtually impossible to avoid overhearing colleagues’ personal phone conversations. If at all possible, stick to texting when absolutely necessary to connect with your friends outside of work. Do not be the “loud talker” everyone can’t stand to have in the office.

Don’t bolt at the end of the day. Especially when you start a new job, don’t be a clock watcher. It can’t hurt to stay a little beyond your designated hours so that everyone sees that you’re more interested in getting the job done and less interested in running for the door.

Appeared on AOLJobs.com.

The post What NOT to do when you start a new job appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.keppiecareers.com/not-start-new-job/feed/ 0
Three ways to find your perfect career http://www.keppiecareers.com/three-ways-find-perfect-career/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/three-ways-find-perfect-career/#comments Wed, 11 Mar 2015 10:30:06 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=12229 Are you in the right job for you? If not, you aren’t alone. According to Gallup’s State of the American Workplace report, 70 percent of American workers are either “not engaged” or “actively disengaged” in their work. One survey states that 68 percent of...

The post Three ways to find your perfect career appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
loveAre you in the right job for you? If not, you aren’t alone. According to Gallup’s State of the American Workplace report, 70 percent of American workers are either “not engaged” or “actively disengaged” in their work. One survey states that 68 percent of working Americans would be willing to take a salary cut to work in a job that better applied their personal interests.

How can you find a role that is a good fit for you and your personality? With the advice to “do what you love” and “follow your passion” abounding online, many strive to match their vocations with their personal interests in an effort to be happier at work. Conventional wisdom suggests that people who are good at and enjoy what they do – while they may be in the minority – are happier and more successful in their jobs.

How can you be one of those people? Philip Hardin is the CEO of YouScience, a scientific, online profile that measures aptitudes and interests and helps students set a direction for their educations and careers. He believes the key to taking control of your career path is finding a career at the intersection of what you’re good at (aptitudes), what you love to do (interests) and what the market needs you to do (opportunity). These are his tips to help identify your path:

1. Understand your aptitudes. Hardin defines aptitudes as the foundation for skill development. He asks: “Have you noticed how easy it is for you to acquire skills in certain areas, while in others – no matter how hard you try – you end up average?” Understanding your natural aptitudes allows you to play to your strengths and focus on those areas that will give you a true competitive advantage. “Everyone could use a competitive advantage in this tight job market, but every career requires a different blend of natural aptitudes.

It’s easy to assess your basic skills. For example, are you a strong communicator, or are you good at math? Read job descriptions carefully and map your skills to what the employers want. Some skills are a little less obvious. Do you think in 3D? (What are your spatial relations skills?) How quickly can you diagnose and critique a problem? (Do you have inductive reasoning capabilities?) Knowing your unique portfolio of aptitudes provides you with a foundation to help target your education, skill development and career.

2. Identify your interests. Wouldn’t it be ideal if you could do what you love at work? Challenges to this proposition, which include not being very good at what you love and there being few prospects in the field you love, can make it tough to accomplish this goal. Hardin notes: “Doing what you love is one important piece of the career puzzle, but your interests are relative to your experience. Your interests evolve over time as you gain life experiences. They are important when considering a career, because they influence your choices and should direct how you apply your natural aptitudes.”

3. Find the opportunities. The marketplace is constantly changing on an international, national and local level. Whether you are 18 or 50, before you focus on a particular career, it’s a good idea to assess the landscape and opportunities. “Is the tide coming in or out for a particular industry or occupation? You have a set of natural aptitudes and interests; it is your job to find out how best to apply them,” Hardin says. “The job market is a moving target. If you are stagnant, it will hurt you.”

Get my free white paper: 5 Mistakes Preventing You From Landing a Job This Week 

Don’t worry, you don’t need to get out your crystal ball or hone clairvoyant abilities to succeed. However, you do need to recognize when the world is changing. When you plan to invest in a career, take a long-term view. What does the job growth look like for a career 10 years from now, and what skills are required to compete? Keep your eyes open to trends, and read news in your industry. Ask people in fields that interest you what they believe to be the trends that will affect the industry and work.

Hardin suggests: “When doing your research, be sure to think globally, and try to understand how changing demographics and technology might affect your industry.” Position yourself to take advantage of opportunities as a result of new technology.

Awareness is a big step in the right career direction. Focus on your skills and how they fit the market that interests you, and you’ll be on a quicker path to job search success.

Originally appeared on U.S. News & World Report

The post Three ways to find your perfect career appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.keppiecareers.com/three-ways-find-perfect-career/feed/ 0
How to get recognized at work http://www.keppiecareers.com/get-recognized-at-work/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/get-recognized-at-work/#comments Mon, 09 Mar 2015 10:30:21 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=12393 Many people feel underappreciated at work. Why? Perhaps the organization does not have a culture that promotes appreciation. Maybe everyone constantly feels under the gun and no one has time to stop and say thank you. You may ask, “How...

The post How to get recognized at work appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
thank-you-textMany people feel underappreciated at work. Why? Perhaps the organization does not have a culture that promotes appreciation. Maybe everyone constantly feels under the gun and no one has time to stop and say thank you. You may ask, “How long does it take to say thank you?”

The reality is, in many workplaces, “thank you” is not automatic, and cannot be expected. In the cut-throat environment where many people toil away every day, it takes a lot more than a job well done to attain the acknowledgement or reward you’d like to see.

Here are tips to get the recognition you deserve when you feel underappreciated at work. (Tweet this thought.)

Identify the stars at your organization and follow their leads. 

Once you figure out who’s doing a great job getting recognition at your workplace, you can leverage that knowledge for your own benefit. Did someone get a huge shout out at the last staff meeting?

Why?

Identify key factors that often lead to recognition. For example, what accomplishment led to the appreciation? Perhaps the organization has more of a tendency to appreciate extra effort; is going above and beyond the call of duty needed to attract appreciation? Is someone appreciated in your office because he or she is a really helpful person to have around in a crisis?

Different organizations value different characteristics at work. Once you see where the bar is set in your organization for recognition, you know what you need to strive to achieve.

Offer insights instead of complaining. 

No one likes a complainer. Like it or not, if you have a reputation for always being a downer at work, it’s going to be difficult to achieve much in the way of recognition. That’s not to say you necessarily have to be a “yes man or woman,” either. Be aware of your attitude and keep it in check if you have a tendency to spout off about every single thing that annoys you. That includes comments on social media, especially if you are connected in any way to anyone connected to your workplace.

Keep in mind: your privacy settings are only as good as your least loose-lipped friend.

Be a problem solver. 

What’s the biggest problem your organization or team faces right now? If you can help take major steps to help solve the problem, or come up with a way to solve it altogether, you will earn recognition. If you still don’t feel appreciated, you may be in the wrong job.

Network in and outside of the office. 

Sometimes, appreciation comes hand-in-hand with relationships. If you’ve been skipping team nights out or prefer to lunch alone, maybe it’s time to make a change and to try to get to know some of the people at work. If you’re not a social person, consider it research instead of socializing. Make it your business to determine what’s most important (in and outside of the office) to your colleagues – and your boss, if possible. You may be surprised to find that a few well-placed lunch appointments can yield interesting information that may help you attract the appreciation you deserve.

Get my free white paper: 5 Mistakes Preventing You From Landing a Job This Week 

Join professional or volunteer organizations. 

While it may not specifically land you appreciation AT work, when you volunteer for your professional association, it’s very likely you’ll have an opportunity to receive some kudos and the “thank you’s” you want at work. A side benefit, you’ll have the opportunity to network with people who can get to know you and your work ethic. Those contacts are key when it’s time to find a new job.

Ask for it. 

While it’s not ideal, perhaps you need to ask for recognition in your workplace. That includes requesting a promotion, a raise or other benefits when appropriate. (Such as after a huge win.) If you don’t get any feedback at all from your boss, request a review. Create a list of your accomplishments and ask for what you want.

It’s possible that you work in a place where the culture is to believe providing a paycheck is thank you enough. If that’s not a good fit for you, after you’ve taken these steps and still aren’t satisfied, it’s time to find a new job where you’ll feel more appreciated.

Originally appeared on AOLJobs.com. 

The post How to get recognized at work appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.keppiecareers.com/get-recognized-at-work/feed/ 0
How to be grateful at work http://www.keppiecareers.com/grateful-at-work/ http://www.keppiecareers.com/grateful-at-work/#comments Fri, 06 Mar 2015 11:30:57 +0000 http://www.keppiecareers.com/?p=12395 As an employee, whether or not your company incorporates being thankful into its mission, do you feel appreciated? Do you believe you should expect more than a paycheck? Bryan Miles, CEO and co-founder of eaHELP, a provider of virtual executive...

The post How to be grateful at work appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
gratefulAs an employee, whether or not your company incorporates being thankful into its mission, do you feel appreciated? Do you believe you should expect more than a paycheck?

Bryan Miles, CEO and co-founder of eaHELP, a provider of virtual executive assistants, knew he wanted “gratitude” to be featured prominently in his company’s values. Here are his suggestions for all leaders and employees to consider this week and all year long:

1. Don’t wait to be grateful. Regardless of your position in an organization, cultivate gratitude as a core part of your work. “Don’t wait until you’re leading a team, a division or a company to become a grateful leader,” Miles says. ”If you do, when you start telling people you’re grateful for them once you’re in the position you want, people won’t buy it.” He suggests you make sure those around you right now understand that you’re grateful for the many ways they help you each and every day.

2. Be humble. Miles believes that if you’re a leader, you know down in your gut that what you’re leading doesn’t have much to do with you. He suggests you acknowledge that you’ve achieved your role, in part, because your team works hard and takes advantage of market opportunities. “Your team looks to you for leadership and for guidance, but when it comes down to the day-to-day wins and losses that actually make up your business, you need to know that those don’t have much to do with you,” Miles says. “You need to be grateful for the team that powers the engine of your business.” Similarly, as a team member, recognize your role in ensuring your team continues to move forward. Be grateful for everyone around you, and don’t be shy about expressing appreciation.

3. Acknowledge that your success depends on others. Being a grateful employee will make you a smarter employee. Admitting that you don’t know everything and that everything you’ve ever learned that’s made you successful has come from someone or something else helps improve your standing in a team. “Being grateful for those from whom you’ve learned is essential if you want to stay humble and teachable and will actually propel you forward in your career,” Miles says.

4. Be sincere. In many cases, being grateful can be disarming. As a leader or a team member, when you are thankful and express it – sincerely and frequently – it will often make people stop in their tracks. “Genuine gratitude is pretty rare in today’s society, which is a shame, but expressing real gratitude sets people apart,” Miles says. If you lead a team, your employees will know when your gratitude is genuine, and they are more likely to put in extra effort. “Grateful leaders have stronger, more effective, more loyal teams,” he says. As an employee, demonstrating gratitude can help set you apart from others in your organization.

Consider how being appreciative at work and expressing those feelings to all team members can help make your organization more successful. When you do, you give the people who work with you even more reasons to be thankful.

Miles says this approach has helped contribute to the success of his organization. He believes his success could very well end, should he fail to incorporate gratitude for those around him. “Gratitude is the only lasting motivator of change,” he says. “It’s the only thing that will propel you to change in the future, if you’re grateful for what you have now.”

This post originally appeared in U.S. News & World Reports.

The post How to be grateful at work appeared first on Keppie Careers.

]]>
http://www.keppiecareers.com/grateful-at-work/feed/ 0